ES

CALORIE TAX HAS NOT LED TO SIGNIFICANT REDUCTIONS in the total calorie intake of people in Mexico.
 

Source: EMIM, INEGI.

 

Soft drinks only represent between 5% and 5.5% of the total calorie intake of people in Mexico.

Source: Data from INEGI and FAO 

IT HAS HAD NO IMPACT on the total sales volume of soft drinks.

Source: Monthly Survey

of the Manufacturing Industry

(EMIM), INEGI)

The approximate TAX BURDEN

of soft drinks is 30%

(16% VAT plus $ 1 per liter of Calorie Tax) 

Data calculated using information from INEGI and SHCP

IMPACT OF CALORIE TAX
In order to fully understand the impact of the $1 peso per liter tax on the consumption of flavored drinks, which came into force in 2014, a number of objective research papers have been published.

MAIN FINDINGS

 

There's no evidence of a significant change in consumption.

Source: ITAM, COLMEX, UANL, INSP

 

No rigorous study has found any direct correlation between the increase in the tax on sugar-sweetened beverages and the modification of patterns of consumption that could affect people’s health.

Source: ITAM, COLMEX

 

 

Based on the existing scientific evidence, it is not possible to confirm that the increase in prices stemming from the tax has had an impact on obesity levels.

Source: ITAM

The special tax has affected the poorest households in the country, given that they set aside a higher percentage of their income for soft drinks.

Fuente: ITAM, UANL, COLMEX

 

During 2014, the average decrease in the volume of beverages subject to the tax being consumed was between 12 - 15 ml per person per day.

Fuente: INSP, UANL

THE OPINIONS OF THE EXPERTS

SOME HARD FACTS

Source: Ministry for Tax and Public Credit (SHCP), CONEVAL, Kantar and INEGI.

 

62% of CALORIE TAX revenue came from low-income households.

CALORIE TAX revenue levied on sugar-sweetened beverages.

30% total indirect

revenue (CALORIE TAX +VAT)

from sugar-sweetened beverages.

EXPERIENCES IN OTHER COUNTRIES

While collaborating to reach comprehensive and efficient solutions to the multifactorial problem of obesity in Mexico and around the world, it is important to understand the evidence and experiences of other countries.

 

SEE DENMARK CASE STUDY              SEE USA CASE STUDY

Christian Schmidt

German Minister for Food and Agriculture

“We have to help people achieve a healthier lifestyle. The key lies in providing accurate and relevant information during childhood. Furthermore, in Mexico, it has been shown that this tax has been a success, but only from a revenue collection standpoint; the consumption of soft drinks is still far from dropping.”

Will Quince

UK Minister of Parliament (MP)

Special taxes have the greatest impact on the poorest households given the tax burden they already face. Furthermore, it is expected that consumers will change to other products and beverages containing greater amounts of sugar, which will affect the end result as people’s eating and drinking habits will not change.

Josep Puxeu

Director of ANFABRA (Spanish Association of Soft Drinks)

We are willing to shoulder the tax burden that corresponds to the entire agri-food sector, but a special tax levied only on us will not be tolerated. We do not pollute more than others, nor do we force anyone to consume more calories. “It is up to the consumer to decide. 30% of production is sugar free.”

Katherine Rich

Director of the Department of Food in New Zealand

“In my research, I have carefully analyzed how in countries such as Mexico and France, which have levied taxes on soft drinks, sales have not changed in the slightest. This decision focuses more on tax than it does on public health.”
     “Governments should not adopt this measure to control obesity levels given that the only thing this tax is going to have an impact on is the consumers’ pockets.”

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